Off the Coast, Maine's International Poetry Journal
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FALL 2015: "The False Linearity of Seeing"

Contributors

Graham Akhurst is an Aboriginal writer from the Kokomini of Northern Queensland.

Prerna Bakshi is a Macao-based poet of Indian origin. She tweets at @bprerna.

Brad Bennett has noticed that we published a bunch of his haiku over the years.

Daya Bhat is a freelance translator also interested in painting, reading and blogging.

Ace Boggess is an ex-con, ex-husband, ex-reporter, and completely exhausted by all the things he isn't anymore.

Michael Burgholzer, a programmer, has published poems and photographs in German language and American literary journals.

Peter Burzynski is a PhD student in Creative Writing-Poetry at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Carol Deprez is a photographer who finds creating images with words as inspiring as with a camera.

Juditha Dowd's Mango in Winter was published in 2013 (Grayson Books).

Jonathan Louis Duckworth is an MFA student at Florida International University.

Bonnie Thompson Enes was the first CT town poet laureate and has been published in newspapers, magazines and 35 journals.

Ariel Francisco is an MFA candidate at Florida International and the assistant editor of Gulf Stream Literary Magazine.

Jennifer Freed has a chapbook, These Hands Still Holding.

Thomas Gillaspy is a photographer with an interest in urban minimalism.

Karen Greenbaum-Maya, a retired clinical psychologist, co-hosts a poetry series.

Carol Hamilton, former poet laureate of Oklahoma, has published 17 books.

Alamgir Hashmi has published numerous books of poetry and literary criticism.

Rage Hezekiah earned her MFA degree from Emerson College.

David V. Hughey, a former college professor and dean, does accounting and tax preparation.

Marcia L. Hurlow's Green Man in Suburbia won the Backwards City Review chapbook prize and her full-length collection, Anomie, won the Edges Prize at WordTech.

Scott Hutchison has new work coming in Blue Bonnet Review, Blue Door Quarterly, The Naugatuck River Review, and Hawaii Pacific Review.

Deborah P. Kolodji is the moderator of the Southern California Haiku Study Group.

Mercedes Lawry has published short fiction, essays and stories and poems for children.

Jenson Leonard is engaged in exploration of the esoteric and liminal spaces of the marginalized, particularly via the black body and the confines of the white literary establishment.

Brandon Lipkowski likes to fish and play guitar.

George Looney founded the BFA in Creative Writing at Penn State Erie, edits Lake Effect, and co-founded the Chautauqua Writers' Festival.

Stewart Manley is a law lecturer at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Ivan de Monbrison is an artist living in Paris.

Tendai Rinos Mwanaka has been published numerous times in Off the Coast.

David Ishaya Osu is a Nigerian poet and board member of the Babishai Niwe Poetry Foundation.

Jimmy Pappas, a retired teacher, is a recent first-prize winner of the Poetry Society of New Hampshire's National Contest.

Simon Perchik has been called America's best unknown poet. We're glad he found us.

Jenna Poulson is a seventeen-year-old writer who loves performing spoken word poetry.

Ana Prundaru lives a stone's throw away from the birthplace of milk chocolate. Her work has been included in SmokeLong Quarterly, Asahi Shimbun, Wilderness House, and elsewhere. Find her at www.anaprundaru.com.

Timothy Robbins makes his living teaching ESL and doing freelance translation from French.

Brad Rose's poetry and fiction may be found at http://bradrosepoetry.blogspot.com/.

Suzannah Spaar received her BA in English from the University of Chicago.

Kelly Talbot has edited books and digital content for over 20 years, previously at John Wiley, Macmillan, and Pearson.

Leah Tieger has been discovered by us.

Molly Touchie took photos during a mission trip to Haiti.

Kathy Weinberg works in antique and architectural restoration including museum period room installation projects.

Paula Yup has been publishing in Off the Coast since before we were here.

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